Mexico City is such a vast place that whichever turn you make you will find something new to experience or to do. And whilst we at Nomadic Bones wanted to see it all, when you factor in some extraordinary day trips (read about one such trip to Teotihuacan HERE) and eventually wanting to get away from the hustle and bustle of city life, you only get to see so much.

Some of our highlights (with photographic evidence) included:

Coyoacán

Coyoacán isn’t a particular place, but rather a borough of Mexico City that harbours some incredible places to visit. For example, the Frida Kahlo (and Diego Rivera) museum is situated within this area, as well as tens of other sites including cafes, shops, and markets that give off an aura of a hippie style that we thoroughly enjoyed.

Frida Kahlo Museum | Nomadic Bones

One other massive highlight of this area was the food – where we highly recommend checking out the Mercado de Coyoacán both for your lunch and for pretty much anything else you could think of buying.

Frida Kahlo (and Diego Rivera) Museum

As mentioned, this is a highlight of getting to the Coyoacán borough, with a fantastic array of both Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera’s paintings and belongings stored in their original house as a museum. Unfortunately there was more of an emphasis on Deigo’s contributions (as a man) than Frida, but once you push past this you can see the lengths that Frida went for her work, despite being quite horrifically injured early on in her life.

Frida Kahlo Museum | Nomadic Bones

A great tip for this museum is to purchase tickets online (HERE) as the line to buy tickets (and then enter) can get quite long. We ended up waiting almost 1 hour to get in and regretted it. You don’t need to print the ticket, as you can show it to them on your phone for entry.

Free Walking Tours

Yes, the idea of a free walking tour has made its way into Mexico, with the wonderful Estacion Mexico providing tours of many areas including the historic centre of Mexico City, and Coyoacán.

Courtyard | Nomadic Bones

A wonderful courtyard during the free walking tour

The guides that we had (we did 2 tours with them) were informative, and despite some ‘Spanglish’ along the way their knowledge shone through and they were great at what they did. Figuring out how much to tip at the end is the only difficult part, where we saw anything from 20 to 500 peso given.

The Historic Centre

There is so much to see in the historic centre, starting with the main square or Zocalo.

Zocalo | Nomadic Bones

Surrounding this area include such highlights as the National Palace, Cathedral, Templo Mayor, Monumento a la Revolución, and many other sites such as museums (the art museum is a must), the original post office (go inside to see the amazing interior design), and one of the first cinemas introduced to Mexico City (which is now funnily enough a porn cinema).

First Cinema in Mexico City

Eventually, once you move away from the Zocalo, you will reach Alameda Central, a park with the fantastic Palacio de Bellas Artes.

Palacio de Bellas Artes | Nomadic Bones

Palacio de Bellas Artes

With so much to see we would recommend the free walking tour to see it all, or plan it out in advance and walk through the streets to see what you can find!

The Food

Of course we have to mention the food, which never ceases to amaze us. The local Mexican fare is always great to try, especially when they cook it right out the front to lure you in!

Mexico City Food | Nomadic Bones

But our biggest recommendation is to locate some of the pastry shops / bakeries which can be found all throughout Mexico City (and Mexico – but the ones in DF have such a massive selection).

Pastries | Nomadic Bones

Yum!

You can easily pick up 4 or 5 pastries as snacks (or even a meal) for under $2US, and the quality is also superb.

Cookies | Nomadic Bones

These were just some of our highlights of this massive city, and there are surely many more to be found. Comment on what we might have missed or your own favourites!

CDMX | Nomadic Bones

Obligatory photo in the Zocalo!

We hope you enjoy your time in this city as much as we did.
Header Photo courtesy of Francisco Diez on Flickr here